Two track diplomacy
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Two track diplomacy negotiations between Israel and the PLO through open and secret channels by Karin Aggestam

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Published by Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Leonard Davis Institute for International Relations in [Jerusalem] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Munaẓẓamat al-Taḥrīr al-Filasṭīnīyah.,
  • Arab-Israeli conflict -- 1993- -- Peace.,
  • Diplomatic negotiations in international disputes.,
  • Israel -- Foreign relations.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 34-38)

StatementKarin Aggestam.
SeriesDavis papers on Israel"s foreign policy -- 53
ContributionsMakhon li-yeḥasim benleʾumiyim ʻal-shem Leʾonard Daiṿis.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDS119.75 .A44 1996
The Physical Object
Pagination38 p. ;
Number of Pages38
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21324201M

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